Choosing a tree

Before you pick your tree:

Measure the space where your tree will sit: it can be very hard to estimate space by eye, and a tree stand could add to the height.

 

Pick your species:

Norway Spruce

The traditional Christmas tree, perfect pyramid shape and fragrance, sadly tend to drop needles in our modern centrally heated houses. Great trees for outdoors, be it a small one for your front garden, or even 40 foot for a town centre.

 

Nordmann Fir

This is the most popular Christmas tree variety. It has a classic ‘Christmas tree shape’ with soft, long dark green foliage and the ability to hold its needles well.

 

Fraser Fir

A beautifully scented tree with excellent needle retention. Most tend to be slim with a slightly erratic branch placement, ideal in a smaller room. Not as regular as a Nordmann, but still a beautiful tree, this is what I have in my house.

 

Lodgepole Pine

Excellent needle retention with a pleasant pine aroma, once a very popular tree, but has given way to Nordmann and Fraser. Not to everyone’s taste, but still a few diehards demand them. Relatively inexpensive.

 

Noble Fir

Said to be King of the Christmas trees, but very difficult to grow, excellent needle retention and a true Christmas fragrance.

 

Blue Spruce

A good looking tree, with a delicate blue/green coloured foliage, unusual fragrance, quite sharp needles with poor retention if used indoors, ideal outdoors or as a pot grown tree.